What You Need to Know About Yellowjackets

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YellowJackets AccurateWhile the world is full of predators and pests, Yellowjackets have a special reputation for being aggressive and annoying. Warding them off can be difficult without the aid of a pest control specialist. It is important to educate yourself on their habits so you can best avoid them.

Facts About Yellowjackets

Classification

Wasps are typically divided into two categories: social wasps and non-social wasps. Social wasps tend to be predators; they seek-out their prey and will aggressively track it down, even if it flees. Many social wasps will helpfully rid the environment of smaller insects and flies.

While southern California does not house many social wasps, it does house the aggressive Yellowjacket. Yellowjackets choose their prey and follow it tirelessly until they are either killed or find something better with which to occupy their time.

Physical Appearance

Yellowjackets are similar to bees in color, sporting a yellow and black look across the abdomen. They are shaped differently, however, with a much more narrow body and a more sinister look. Some species of Yellowjackets can also have red and white marks on their bodies.

Diet

As larvae, Yellowjackets feed on protein. As already mentioned, one benefit of social wasps is that they help eliminate gardens and plants of other annoying insects. This is because they bring them back to their nests for the larvae to eat.

As adults, Yellowjackets feed on the typical “bee food,” including sugar, nectar, and fruit. In other words, they don’t pursue their prey for sustenance, but rather as a defense.

Habitat

Yellowjackets are not unique to the United States; however, there are between 15-20 species that live in the U.S. borders. The queen begins a new colony every spring, and nests can be found in standard places such as trees, bushes, and corners of houses.

Attacks

Yellowjackets are not likely to become interested in you unless they spot you near their nest. They are extremely territorial and will aggressively pursue you if they sense you are a threat to their colony.

Additionally, unlike the average bee, Yellowjackets can sting more than once. Their stings are quite painful and can cause severe allergic reactions in those with a sensitivity to bee stings and wasp venom.

Understanding the habits of Yellowjackets is the first step to avoiding them; however, if the problem persists near your home, it is always a good idea to call a professional in the pest control industry to eliminate them. If you live in Southern California, call us today and let our trained professionals help you rid your home of unwanted guests.

While the world is full of predators and pests, Yellowjackets have a special reputation for being aggressive and annoying. Warding them off can be difficult without the aid of a pest control specialist. It is important to educate yourself on their habits so you can best avoid them.

Facts About Yellowjackets

Classification

Wasps are typically divided into two categories: social wasps and non-social wasps. Social wasps tend to be predators; they seek-out their prey and will aggressively track it down, even if it flees. Many social wasps will helpfully rid the environment of smaller insects and flies.

While southern California does not house many social wasps, it does house the aggressive Yellowjacket. Yellowjackets choose their prey and follow it tirelessly until they are either killed or find something better with which to occupy their time.

Physical Appearance

Yellowjackets are similar to bees in color, sporting a yellow and black look across the abdomen. They are shaped differently, however, with a much more narrow body and a more sinister look. Some species of Yellowjackets can also have red and white marks on their bodies.

Diet

As larvae, Yellowjackets feed on protein. As already mentioned, one benefit of social wasps is that they help eliminate gardens and plants of other annoying insects. This is because they bring them back to their nests for the larvae to eat.

As adults, Yellowjackets feed on the typical “bee food,” including sugar, nectar, and fruit. In other words, they don’t pursue their prey for sustenance, but rather as a defense.

Habitat

Yellowjackets are not unique to the United States; however, there are between 15-20 species that live in the U.S. borders. The queen begins a new colony every spring, and nests can be found in standard places such as trees, bushes, and corners of houses.

Attacks

Yellowjackets are not likely to become interested in you unless they spot you near their nest. They are extremely territorial and will aggressively pursue you if they sense you are a threat to their colony.

Additionally, unlike the average bee, Yellowjackets can sting more than once. Their stings are quite painful and can cause severe allergic reactions in those with a sensitivity to bee stings and wasp venom.

Understanding the habits of Yellowjackets is the first step to avoiding them; however, if the problem persists near your home, it is always a good idea to call a professional in the pest control industry to eliminate them. If you live in Southern California, call us today and let our trained professionals help you rid your home of unwanted guests.

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