Where do Mosquitoes Go in Winter?

Mosquitoes go in winter, but whereWinter seems to be the salvation for a large number of people, because it means that mosquitoes, termites, and pests in general, along with their possible diseases, diminish. People often ask where mosquitoes go in winter because it’s amazing how they seem to disappear.

During the summer these insects believe themselves kings of the world, but as winter approaches, their activity slows down. If you observe them carefully, you will notice them fly as if their own body weighs them down.

Do mosquitoes disappear or die?

Perhaps we all want them to die, but the truth is that many mosquitoes manage to hide, like other insects, in our homes where the temperatures are not too low. Once hidden, they enter a state of “hibernation” for six to twelve months, and then later emerge to attack our homes again.

This state of hibernation can occur in any of the phases of the development of the mosquito: egg, larva, pupa or adulthood. Explained in a simpler way, it means that they stop their growth or development until the temperatures return to be optimal conditions for their growth.

How is their life cycle?

To best fight off mosquitoes, it helps to know their life cycle.

A great example is the Tiger Mosquito, known for transmitting the Zika virus. The Tiger Mosquito spends the winter as an egg, which means that it will grow and be ready to attack during the summer.

Like all species, they adapt to the environment for their survival. When winter approaches, the females deposit their eggs in places with little water. As seasons change, the rain will provide needed water. Then as the eggs hatch the mosquitoes have a great environment to develop in.

Why do they attack in summer?

First of all, as explained before, the development of mosquitoes stops during winter.  However, there are other reasons why these insects prefer summer:

  • Fertilization: once the females are fertilized they need blood to be able to lay the eggs. Summer offers more opportunities to get blood as there are more people and animals outside.
  • The heat: Heat helps the breeding process. The larval stage lasts only a week in the summer, while in winter it lasts up to two months. Heat also means people wear less clothing and the mosquito has ample places to bite.
  • The rain: Rain makes puddles of water. These are the perfect places to lay eggs because the water is stagnant and there are no predators. Therefore, the larvae have a better chance of survival. 

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