Structural vs Aesthetic Repairs: What’s the Difference?

Structural vs Aesthetic repairsNot all repairs in your home are for the same purpose.

There is a difference between plans to repair structural inconsistencies in your home and plans to improve the aesthetics of your home.

As a responsible homeowner, you know that best practices dictate that your property should be inspected and treated once a year for termites. (see Termites are House Cancer).

Paired with the yearly termite inspection and treatment program in your home, repairs to your home’s structural components should also be done regularly as necessary to prevent accruing large amounts of damage caused by termites or other wood destroying organisms. (see How can I prevent a termite infestation).

Being able to differentiate between repair plans that will produce increased structural integrity and those that only serve to improve aesthetics is key to help you make the right choice and achieve the results you want out of your home improvement investments.

Not all repairs in your home are for the same purpose.

There is a difference between plans to repair structural inconsistencies in your home and plans to improve the aesthetics of your home.

As a responsible homeowner, you know that best practices dictate that your property should be inspected and treated once a year for termites. (see Termites are House Cancer).

Paired with the yearly termite inspection and treatment program in your home, repairs to your home’s structural components should also be done regularly as necessary to prevent accruing large amounts of damage caused by termites or other wood destroying organisms. (see How can I prevent a termite infestation).

Being able to differentiate between repair plans that will produce increased structural integrity and those that only serve to improve aesthetics is key to help you make the right choice and achieve the results you want out of your home improvement investments.

To help make the point clear, let’s pretend you have received two different scopes and bids for repairs of your residential structure. One of the bids comes from a licensed termite inspector and the other from a general contractor.

Unless the general or painting contractor also employs probing in their inspection, some termite and fungus-rot damage, along with issues of structural integrity, may be missed in drafting the original scope.

Typically a general constr